IPM Calendar 
Saturday 23 September 2017   Today  
Events for day: Wednesday 19 July 2017    
           11:00 - 12:00     Quantum information biweekly journal club
Quantum Loop Topography for Machine Learning (Continuation)

School
NANO SCIENCES

Quantum Loop Topography for Machine Learning

Despite rapidly growing interest in harnessing machine learning in the study of quantum many-body systems, training neural networks to identify quantum phases is a nontrivial challenge. The key challenge is in efficiently extracting essential information from the many-body Hamiltonian or wave function and turning the information into an image that can be fed into a neural network. When targeting topological phases, this task becomes particularly challenging as topological phases are defined in terms of nonlocal properties. Here, we introduce quantum loop topography (QLT): a proced ...

           14:00 - 15:00     Weekly Seminar
Multi scale modeling of microtubule under influence of external electric field: molecular dynamics and coarse grain methods

School
NANO SCIENCES

Multi scale modeling of microtubule under influence of external electric field: molecular dynamics and coarse grain methods

Microtubule (MT) rigidity and response to 2450 MHz electric field were investigated, via multi scale modeling approach. For this purpose, six systems were designed and simulated to consider all types of feasible interactions between (alpha) and (beta) monomers in MT, by using all atom molecular dynamics method. Subsequently, coarse grain modeling was used to design different lengths of MT. Investigation of effects of external 2450 MHz electric field on MT showed MT less rigidity in the presence of such ...

           15:30 - 16:30     Weekly Seminar
Single Top Polarisation

School
PARTICLES AND ACCELERATORS



Larak Seminar Room ...

           16:00 - 17:00     Monthly Colloquium How Biological Tissues respond to external forces? An Optical Tweezers study
School
NANO SCIENCES

How Biological Tissues respond to external forces?
An Optical Tweezers study


A tightly focused laser beam can "trap" micron-sized dielectric objects just like an "Optical Tweezers", as its inventor "Arthur Ashkin" named it. The nature of the force acting on the irradiated object depends on several parameters, the most important of which being size and material of the object as well as the wavelength and wave front geometry of the irradiation. It can be shown that a TEM00 laser beam, which is focused through a lens with millimeter-range focal length, can exert a Hookean force on a dielectric object with a refract ...