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IPM
30
YEARS OLD

“School of Cognitive Sciences”

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Paper   IPM / Cognitive Sciences / 12163
School of Cognitive Sciences
  Title:   Functional interaction between morphine and central amygdala cannabinoid CB1 receptors in the acquisition and expression of conditioned place preference
  Author(s): 
1.  Ameneh Rezayof
2.  Maryam Sardari
3.  Mohammad-Reza Zarrindast
4.  Touraj Nayer-Nouri
  Status:   Published
  Journal: BEHAV BRAIN RES
  Vol.:  220
  Year:  2011
  Pages:   1-8
  Supported by:  IPM
  Abstract:
The present study was done to determine whether cannabinoid CB1 receptors of the central amygdala (CeA) are implicated in morphine-induced place preference. Using a 3-day schedule of conditioning, it was found that subcutaneous (s.c.) administration of morphine (2, 4 and 6 mg/kg) caused a significant dose-dependent conditioned place preference (CPP) in male Wistar rats. Intra-CeA microinjection of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist arachidonylcyclopropylamide (ACPA; 0.5, 2.5 and 5 ng/rat) dosedependently potentiated the morphine (2 mg/kg)-induced CPP. Furthermore, the administration of ACPA (5 ng/rat, intra-CeA) alone induced a significant CPP. It should be considered that the higher dose of ACPA (5 ng/rat, intra-CeA) in combination with morphine decreased locomotor activity on the testing phase. On the other hand, intra-CeA microinjection of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist AM251 (120 ng/rat) alone induced a significant conditioned place aversion (CPA). Moreover, intra-CeA microinjection of AM251 (90 and 120 ng/rat) inhibited the morphine-induced place preference with a significant interaction. Intra-CeA microinjection of AM251 reversed the effect of ACPA on morphine response. Interestingly, microinjection of ACPA (2.5 and 5 ng/rat) or AM251 (60?120 ng/rat) into the CeA increased or decreased the expression of morphine (6 mg/kg)-induced place preference respectively. These observations provide evidence that cannabinoid CB1 receptors of the CeA are involved in mediating reward and these receptors are also implicated in the acquisition and expression of morphine-induced CPP.

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